Quick Quirky Quotes™ for Week of April 14, 2014

Clown clear 4 for blogSobriety Test
“If you’re the designated driver, have fun with it. At the end of the night drop the people off at the wrong houses.” – Jeff Foxworthy

Keep Failing Until You Get It Right
“How do you get started in this business?” they ask.
“You go out and you fail.” – Stephen Colbert when comedians ask how they can break into the business

Choose One
“You have three choices in life: be good, get good, or give up.” – Gregory House, “House M.D.”

Plugging Away
“You never master anything. You just keep working at it.” – Denzel Washington to David Letterman on his hobby of boxing

Political Advisor
“I have too much respect for the truth to drag it out on every trifling occasion.” – Mark Twain

 

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Icon Cover - AE - Red Ribbon 6Get a FREE copy (PDF abridged edition) of my new book The Wickedly Fun Dictionary of Business – Words That Escaped Me Before My Brain Finished Downloading. It’s quick. It’s quirky. It’s fun!

Download it free at http://www.FootInTheDoor.com.

Here’s a quick peek:

butt-dial, v. Smart ass.

consciously incompetent, adj. The second lowest level of competence. You’re stupid and you know it. Why the Dummies and Idiots books are so popular.

kiss off, v.t. The subject line on your email from your last job interview.

texting, v. Wrds wtht vwls. (Why texting isn’t big in Hawaii.)
“Dear Students: I know when you’re texting in class. Seriously, no one just looks down at their crotch and smiles. Sincerely, Your Teacher.” – Sign posted in high school class

unconsciously incompetent, n. The lowest level of competence. You’re stupid and you don’t know it. It’s when someone asks you to name the ten Supreme Court Justices and you actually come up with ten names.

unintended consequences. Didn’t see that coming! Your mind leaving you thoughtless and alone without telling you it was going.
“Oops!” – Embarrassed presidential contender, and Texas Governor, Rick Perry with his 53-second brain freeze unable to remember one of the three federal departments he wanted to abolish in a nationally televised GOP debate

Attention business owners, sales managers, salespeople, and marketing executives: at the back of the book you’ll see a referral strategy to find new business if you’d rather not cold call.

Why Should I Buy From You?

manandwomanworkingThat’s the thought going through the buyer’s mind, whether you’re making the presentation or closing the deal. He’s not asking why he should buy your service or product. He can buy that from anyone. He wants to know what you bring to the table.

You could have acquired that answer on your very first interview with the prospect and saved it to clinch the deal. An effective question for me to ask the client on the first appointment is, “Why am I  here?” The customer is so surprised by the straight-forwardness of the question that he’ll blurt out why he’s unhappy with his current vendor, service, or product and then proceed to tell me exactly what he’s looking for in both me and the service.

When we get to crunch time and he asks, “Why should I buy from you?” I repeat back his own words – the answer – he gave me the first day.

How Can I Get Our Salespeople to Ask for the Order?

Lunch Cover with Free Offer 2One of the biggest complaints by business owners and sales managers is that their people never ask for the order. Having lunch with a couple of business owners in New Brunswick, New Jersey, one complained that there had to be some easy way to get his people to ask for the order.

There is. I gave him a 3 x 5 card and told him it was his. Make copies and give it to his salespeople and tell them to give it to the prospect just before getting up to leave the customers’ office. Then let me know if their sales didn’t increase.

He reported that not only did his people close more deals, but they had more fun doing it, and the customers always got a laugh out of it. It added to their expense accounts, but he said the new sales and new business was worth every penny.

What did the card say?

Why Do Business with Me

                                                                       

This is from my PDF ebook, Lunch? – 20 Sales Questions I’ve Been Asked Over Lunch, which you can get for FREE by going to my website http://www.FootInTheDoor.com and requesting your copy.

South Dakota, Snow Blowers, and Trust

Snow blowin'

Joe Moore, VP Sales & Marketing, Native American Herbal Tea Company, South Dakota is a closer.

Joe was a contractor for the U.S. Department of Education and recovered billions of dollars for the agency during his ten year stint with them. His job was to get students now in the workforce to pay back their student loans. He closed most all the deals he was involved in because he earned people’s trust. What he passes on can help you close – or lose – more sales.

The department head of a local hardware store in his South Dakota neighborhood offered to help Joe find some of the supplies he needed to winterize his home. The supplies were scattered throughout the store. After helping with the first two items, the salesman simply thanked Joe and walked away. Joe needed to buy more, but the salesman was two and done.

The salesman’s vanishing act reminded Joe why he was such a successful closer: he could create trust with just two words. Joe gained enough trust to get the former students to repay their loans.

What are Joe’s two secret words? After each question was asked and answered, Joe would always prod for more.

“What else?”

There may be another question or ten, but after each answer, Joe kept returning to the well with “What else?” until the well was dry. At the end of the call Joe knew the individual felt comfortable enough with him to stick to the payment plan agreed to.

“What else?” creates trust because it shows that you care and that you’re not distracted by the next shiny object.  Joe said that “If only the hardware store had asked ‘What else?’ that day he could have made a snow blower sale.”

It’s no snow job: Harvard psychologist and Professor Dr. Nalini Ambady found that 71% of the purchasing decision is based upon trust between the salesperson and the prospect.