Eeck! You Sound Like Every Other Salesperson

Bluebonnets

“Why should I do business with you?”

“Because of our reputation. Best value for the money. Established brand. Truly believe in customer service. Our staff is the best.”

If these are your answers, then yes, you do look like every other company. Yes, you will lose the sale. If your competitors can (and they will) say the same thing, then you’re just whistlin’ Dixie.

When you’re asked that question, your first response should be, “What do you need to know to make a good decision?” They’re not looking to buy your product. They’re looking for how to make the right decision. They know. You don’t. Find out.

Advertisements

Have I Got An Opportunity for You!

personality

You have an amazing service or product. It provides a tremendous opportunity for the customer. But they’re not buying. Why? Are they blind? Can’t they see what a great opportunity you’re presenting?

If you don’t know the four personalities, now is the time to learn: Drivers, Expressives, Analyticals, and Amiables. Of the four, only the Drivers and Expressives are looking for new, exciting opportunities. They’re willing to take risks. But they only account for 30% of the population.

The Analyticals and Amiables account for the other 70%. Opportunities don’t excite them. They’re concerned about avoiding problems. They’re more concerned about making a bad decision.

“What if I get your product home and down the road decide I don’t like it?”

“If I invest with you, what are the chances my investment will tank and I’ll lose everything?”

If you’re a Driver or Expressive salesperson, all you see are opportunities. You think your customers should be visionaries like you. They’re not. So change your tactics. Identify the personality you’re selling to and talk about what concerns them the most.

The Nordstrom salesman says, “You will be completely satisfied with any of the shoes you buy from us – or we’ll give you a 100% refund anytime. No questions asked.”

The financial consultant can tell by the number of questions you ask that you’re leery of making a move. “Let’s not gamble with your money. The best way to protect your investment is to divide it up. We’ll only put 20% into mutual funds, 50% into government bonds, and the rest into savings.”

Identify the personality you’re talking with before making your presentation. It’s a great opportunity to avoid problems.

Break the Hypnotic Trance

English: two-seam fastball 日本語: ツーシームの握り

Joe Vitale (Buying Trances) says that prospects are often in a trance. “All vendors are the same” is a trance.

Joe said that what the salesperson has to do is move the client from his trance to the salesperson’s trance in three steps.

  1. Identify his trance. (“All vendors are the same.”)
  2. Agree with his beliefs to gain rapport. (“Yes, we do seem to look alike.”)
  3. Lead his belief to your offer. (“But here’s what makes us different.” New trance.)

Practice it with your kids.

“All baseball pitches are the same,” your child says.

“Yes,” you agree, “they certainly all look alike.”

Then show your child the four-seam fastball grip.

“This pitch will appear to rise when it’s not because it’s not dropping as fast as the batter’s brain thinks it should.”

Next, show your two-seam fastball grip.

“What makes this pitch different is it’s slightly slower and causes the baseball to change directions.”

Change people’s trances to change their beliefs.

Beware the Silent Buyer

The following excerpt is from Cast in Stone – 45 sales fundamentals that should never be tampered with:

Following up on a salesperson’s presentation (she lost the sale) I asked the prospect why he didn’t buy. Was it price? Competition? Were his needs not filled?

No, no, and no.

He said the salesperson was the problem. She talked too much and every time he tried to bring up a point, she dismissed it as if it was unimportant and continued on with her presentation. He said that he finally just kept his mouth shut, didn’t ask any questions, didn’t offer any comments, and didn’t throw out any objections. He just silently wished she would leave.

When she got back to the office she commented she thought the presentation went well and the customer “didn’t have a single objection.” She was pleased. Until she found out a week later she lost the deal.

Silence may be golden, but it doesn’t mean they’re buying.

To learn more and to order your book today, visit www.FootInTheDoor.com.