How Your Employees Are Unselling You

Nice Reception people at DICE in Stockholm

It’s tough enough in sales to find and sell to new customers. It’s even tougher when your biggest competitor is your own company. Most employees think it’s only the salespeople who sell.

Little do they realize that they, too, are exhibiting sales skills every time they have contact with customers.

The sale starts with the gatekeeper. What’s the attitude when the phone is answered? Do the words and attitude match? Does she mean it when she says, “How can I help?”, or does she convey, “You’re bothering me. What do you want?”

When a customer comes in with a service problem, does the service person feel he’s being imposed upon? “You’re a pain” is often the message customers receive.

Billing problem? I’ve seen hundreds of accounts lost because the billing department was indifferent, rude, or downright obnoxious.

Selling is tough. Don’t make it impossible. Quit competing against yourself.

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Yes, There Is a Free Lunch!

The following is an excerpt from Lunch? – 20 Sales Questions I’ve Been Asked Over Lunch. You can get a free PDF copy at www.FootInTheDoor.com to pass on to anyone you like.

One of the biggest complaints by business owners and sales managers is that their people never ask for the order. Having lunch with a couple of business owners in New Brunswick, New Jersey, one complained that there had to be some easy way to get his people to ask for the order.

There is. I gave him a 3 x 5 card and told him it was his. Make copies and give it to his salespeople and tell them to give it to the prospect just before getting up to leave the customers’ office. Then let me know if their sales didn’t increase.

He reported that not only did his people close more deals, but they had more fun doing it, and the customers always got a laugh out of it. It added to their expense accounts, but he said the new sales and new business was worth every penny.

What did the card say?

It’s Okay to Be a Coward When Cold Calling

People ask why I call my seminars and book Cold Calling for Cowards®. Here is an excerpt from my book explaining the reason behind the use of the word “coward”:

“Dr. Viktor Frankl was an Austrian, psychiatrist – and Jewish. Dr. Frankl and his sister would be the only two from his family to survive the German death camps. At the end of the war he wrote the book, Man’s Search for Meaning.

“Dr. Frankl created the word logotherapy. He’s also the father of the phrase paradoxical intention, which is what logotherapy means. His concept says that it seems the more you want something, the more elusive it becomes. The harder you try to grasp the prize, the more slippery it becomes. He said you can actually use this concept to your advantage, especially when it comes to physical sensations.

“For example, in the morning you’re staring at that 300 pound phone, knowing you need to make your cold calls. Your hands begin to shake. Perspiration forms on your brow. Your breathing is rushed. Your voice squeaks. You surrender to your fears. You can’t do it. You suddenly remember the report that’s due next week. (Sales managers know that if they have paperwork that needs to be completed, just tell their salespeople to cold call.) You’ll make your calls tomorrow.

“No you won’t. Who are you kidding?

“Use Dr. Frankl’s paradoxical intention to overcome your fears.

“When you’re cold calling, get a 3×5 card and write the word COWARD on it. Try to be a coward when you call the people. Try to physically shake. Try to hyperventilate. Try to have your mind go blank. The funny thing is, the harder you try, the calmer you get. Paradoxical intention.”

To learn more and order a copy visit www.FootInTheDoor.com.