How Can I Make Meetings Shorter?

Lunch Cover with Free OfferThe executive vice president of sales in San Francisco was definitely a Driver personality. Cut to the chase. Make your point and shut up.

“I hate meetings! Tell me something I can do to make them shorter and quit wasting my time.”

Easy. Stand up.

When people stop by your office or cubicle, whether invited or not, and you want to make the meeting a quick one, the secret is to make them uncomfortable.

By standing up, they won’t sit down. Your actions tell them to be brief, make their point, and leave.

Other advantages: when standing, you think 20% faster because your heart rate increases by ten beats per minute. Plus, you make quicker and more accurate decisions.

Got a sales meeting? Take out all the chairs. Everyone stands. A one hour meeting will be over in ten minutes.

Stand up when talking on the phone. Your conversations will be shorter, you’ll be more direct, your confidence increases, and you can use your body language to put energy and enthusiasm into your words.

A broker in Los Angeles told me that he removed all the chairs in the sales room where the brokers made their calls. Their sales increased by 35% the first month alone. The only time the brokers could sit down was to enter orders into the computers. But once on the phone, they had to stand. Some of the brokers even went so far as to make stands on their desks so their computers could be at eye level while standing. Think about it. Ever see anyone sitting on the floor at the New York Stock Exchange?
                                               

The above is an excerpt from Lunch? – 20 Sales Questions I’ve Been Asked Over Lunch. You can get a FREE PDF copy at www.FootInTheDoor.com to pass on to anyone you like.

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If You Interrupt Me Again…!

Let Me Finish

Break the Hypnotic Trance

English: two-seam fastball 日本語: ツーシームの握り

Joe Vitale (Buying Trances) says that prospects are often in a trance. “All vendors are the same” is a trance.

Joe said that what the salesperson has to do is move the client from his trance to the salesperson’s trance in three steps.

  1. Identify his trance. (“All vendors are the same.”)
  2. Agree with his beliefs to gain rapport. (“Yes, we do seem to look alike.”)
  3. Lead his belief to your offer. (“But here’s what makes us different.” New trance.)

Practice it with your kids.

“All baseball pitches are the same,” your child says.

“Yes,” you agree, “they certainly all look alike.”

Then show your child the four-seam fastball grip.

“This pitch will appear to rise when it’s not because it’s not dropping as fast as the batter’s brain thinks it should.”

Next, show your two-seam fastball grip.

“What makes this pitch different is it’s slightly slower and causes the baseball to change directions.”

Change people’s trances to change their beliefs.

Asking Questions Isn’t Just About Getting Answers

English: Actor/Model Oris Erhuero

Answers to your questions give you more knowledge. That’s a given. But questions are often more important than the answers you get.

One of the most important reasons is to get the customer to relax. Asking easy questions allows you to establish a baseline for how to judge future body language signals he’s going to send. When he’s talking about his vacation, he’ll be leaning towards you, gesturing with his hands, smiling, and chin up. When you ask a critical question in a few minutes, he may lean away from you, cross his arms, put his chin down, and furrow his brow. These physical clues are more important information than any answers he may try to deceive you with.

By establishing a baseline for how he acts, you can determine which specific questions make him anxious, causes stress, or gets him to open up. Then you can adapt your presentation.

How to Start a Conversation with the CEO

English: Henry Kissinger at the 2009 premiere ...

When making a sales call on the CEO or president, how should you begin the conversation?

  1. With several minutes of small talk
  2. Cut to the chase
  3. Wait until the CEO steers the conversation to the subject at hand

(2) Head honchos are usually Driver or Analytical personalities – neither enjoys small talk. Assume you only have fifteen minutes. Take the lead, cut to the chase, and start with your most important point first. It may be the only point you get to make. Speak in specifics: numbers, percentages, and dollars. Be prepared to prove every statement.

Helen Thomas knows where to start: Trying to evade a difficult question, Secretary of State Henry Kissinger said the answer was too long and he didn’t know where to start. Helen Thomas responded, “Then start at the end.”