Waiting for the Interview

Waiting for the InterviewThree men you’ll be interviewing are in the waiting room. You get a peek of them through your office door. The man in the center…

  1. What does his posture tell you?
  2. What’s his attitude about the pending interview?
  3. What do you do?

Answers

  1. Known as the splaying position, he is seeking to dominate the environment. He’s trying to take as much territory away from the other two men as possible.
  2. Splaying at home shows comfort and it’s okay. But on a job interview, where serious matters will be discussed, it’s a sign of indifference and disrespect.
  3. You have to let him know he can’t disrespect you. You can do it by admonishing him to sit up. But even better, when you silently approach him and invade his territory, he will. If not? Interview over.

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When Do You Finally Give Up Calling On a Prospect?

frontConsider this:

  • 44% of salespeople stop calling on the prospect after one call.
  • 22% stop after the second call.
  • 14% after the third call.
  • 12% after the fourth call.
  • Thus, 92% of salespeople stop after four calls.

Combine that information with this:

  • 15% of the prospects can make a decision within 1-2 calls.
  • 15% within 2-3 calls.
  • 35% within 4-5 calls.
  • 35% within 5-7 calls.

Notice that 70% of the people you call on will not even make a decision until you get beyond that fourth call.  If there is a magic number, it would be five.

But as long as a prospect is using a service or product I sell, I never stop calling. The reason: things change. Decision makers come and go, money comes and goes, needs come and go, and competitors come and go.
                                               

This information is from my book, Cold Calling for Cowards: How to Turn the Fear of Rejection into Opportunities, Sales, and Money available in ebook or paperback

Okay, Sherlock, What Do You Know Now?

Driver's deskYou’re ushered into the customer’s office for the first time. You’ve never met her before. The large, clean desk dominates the room. How are you going to conduct this sales call?

  1. Are you going to persuade with warmth, flair, or conviction?
  2. Will you appeal to feelings, procedures, or goals?
  3. Will your pace be fast/decisive, slow/systematic, or slow/relaxed?

ANSWERS

The large, clean desk is an indicator that you’re dealing with a Driver personality.

  1. Sell her with the conviction that you believe in what you’re doing and selling. She can spot a phony a mile away.
  2. She’s the boss because she knows how to set goals and reach them. That’s what she’s looking for from you.
  3. She’s likely to make a decision on this first call. Be fast, decisive, and get to the point. She has no time for small talk.

The Peacock

Standing businesswomanYou’re the vendor calling on the CEO of a small company.  The reason for the sales call is to let the CEO know that you’re not going to cave on the negotiation point she wants.

As you’re ushered into her office, she’s standing beside her desk with both hands on her hips.

  1. Why is she standing this way?
  2. Is she intimidated, or is she trying to intimidate you?
  3. Will you ever see subordinates stand like this?

Answers

  1. Like a peacock spreading its feathers, she’s trying to appear larger and fend off any attacks.
  2. Could be both. If she feels she’s about to be ripped off, she’s trying to reestablish her dominance. And if she’s in a position of authority, she’ll stand this way to intimidate others.
  3. Rarely will subordinates confront their boss like this, unless they’re suddenly angered or suffer some sort of indignation.

It’s Okay to Be a Coward When Cold Calling

People ask why I call my seminars and book Cold Calling for Cowards®. Here is an excerpt from my book explaining the reason behind the use of the word “coward”:

“Dr. Viktor Frankl was an Austrian, psychiatrist – and Jewish. Dr. Frankl and his sister would be the only two from his family to survive the German death camps. At the end of the war he wrote the book, Man’s Search for Meaning.

“Dr. Frankl created the word logotherapy. He’s also the father of the phrase paradoxical intention, which is what logotherapy means. His concept says that it seems the more you want something, the more elusive it becomes. The harder you try to grasp the prize, the more slippery it becomes. He said you can actually use this concept to your advantage, especially when it comes to physical sensations.

“For example, in the morning you’re staring at that 300 pound phone, knowing you need to make your cold calls. Your hands begin to shake. Perspiration forms on your brow. Your breathing is rushed. Your voice squeaks. You surrender to your fears. You can’t do it. You suddenly remember the report that’s due next week. (Sales managers know that if they have paperwork that needs to be completed, just tell their salespeople to cold call.) You’ll make your calls tomorrow.

“No you won’t. Who are you kidding?

“Use Dr. Frankl’s paradoxical intention to overcome your fears.

“When you’re cold calling, get a 3×5 card and write the word COWARD on it. Try to be a coward when you call the people. Try to physically shake. Try to hyperventilate. Try to have your mind go blank. The funny thing is, the harder you try, the calmer you get. Paradoxical intention.”

To learn more and order a copy visit www.FootInTheDoor.com.