How Can I Get Our Salespeople to Ask for the Order?

Lunch Cover with Free Offer 2One of the biggest complaints by business owners and sales managers is that their people never ask for the order. Having lunch with a couple of business owners in New Brunswick, New Jersey, one complained that there had to be some easy way to get his people to ask for the order.

There is. I gave him a 3 x 5 card and told him it was his. Make copies and give it to his salespeople and tell them to give it to the prospect just before getting up to leave the customers’ office. Then let me know if their sales didn’t increase.

He reported that not only did his people close more deals, but they had more fun doing it, and the customers always got a laugh out of it. It added to their expense accounts, but he said the new sales and new business was worth every penny.

What did the card say?

Why Do Business with Me

                                                                       

This is from my PDF ebook, Lunch? – 20 Sales Questions I’ve Been Asked Over Lunch, which you can get for FREE by going to my website http://www.FootInTheDoor.com and requesting your copy.

Advertisements

How Your Employees Are Unselling You

Nice Reception people at DICE in Stockholm

It’s tough enough in sales to find and sell to new customers. It’s even tougher when your biggest competitor is your own company. Most employees think it’s only the salespeople who sell.

Little do they realize that they, too, are exhibiting sales skills every time they have contact with customers.

The sale starts with the gatekeeper. What’s the attitude when the phone is answered? Do the words and attitude match? Does she mean it when she says, “How can I help?”, or does she convey, “You’re bothering me. What do you want?”

When a customer comes in with a service problem, does the service person feel he’s being imposed upon? “You’re a pain” is often the message customers receive.

Billing problem? I’ve seen hundreds of accounts lost because the billing department was indifferent, rude, or downright obnoxious.

Selling is tough. Don’t make it impossible. Quit competing against yourself.

Have I Got An Opportunity for You!

personality

You have an amazing service or product. It provides a tremendous opportunity for the customer. But they’re not buying. Why? Are they blind? Can’t they see what a great opportunity you’re presenting?

If you don’t know the four personalities, now is the time to learn: Drivers, Expressives, Analyticals, and Amiables. Of the four, only the Drivers and Expressives are looking for new, exciting opportunities. They’re willing to take risks. But they only account for 30% of the population.

The Analyticals and Amiables account for the other 70%. Opportunities don’t excite them. They’re concerned about avoiding problems. They’re more concerned about making a bad decision.

“What if I get your product home and down the road decide I don’t like it?”

“If I invest with you, what are the chances my investment will tank and I’ll lose everything?”

If you’re a Driver or Expressive salesperson, all you see are opportunities. You think your customers should be visionaries like you. They’re not. So change your tactics. Identify the personality you’re selling to and talk about what concerns them the most.

The Nordstrom salesman says, “You will be completely satisfied with any of the shoes you buy from us – or we’ll give you a 100% refund anytime. No questions asked.”

The financial consultant can tell by the number of questions you ask that you’re leery of making a move. “Let’s not gamble with your money. The best way to protect your investment is to divide it up. We’ll only put 20% into mutual funds, 50% into government bonds, and the rest into savings.”

Identify the personality you’re talking with before making your presentation. It’s a great opportunity to avoid problems.

When a Brick Isn’t a Brick

BRICKS

Customer give you a problem you can’t solve? Having a hard time to be creative to develop a new marketing piece? Psychologist Ellen Langer said to get the creative juices flowing, add the simple phrase “could be” to look at a problem.

Her experiments showed that if one group of subjects were given a brick and were told “it’s a brick”, they couldn’t see any other creative uses for it. Their mindset was frozen as “it’s a brick”. The next test group was given the same brick and told, “This could be a brick.”

When the last group was asked how many other ways a brick could be used, they said it could serve as a foot warmer, weapon, paperweight, step, bookend, fulcrum, or as a source for red powder.

Solve this problem: Price could be a factor. (That’s right – price is no longer just a brick.)