Okay, Sherlock, What Do You Know Now?

Driver's deskYou’re ushered into the customer’s office for the first time. You’ve never met her before. The large, clean desk dominates the room. How are you going to conduct this sales call?

  1. Are you going to persuade with warmth, flair, or conviction?
  2. Will you appeal to feelings, procedures, or goals?
  3. Will your pace be fast/decisive, slow/systematic, or slow/relaxed?

ANSWERS

The large, clean desk is an indicator that you’re dealing with a Driver personality.

  1. Sell her with the conviction that you believe in what you’re doing and selling. She can spot a phony a mile away.
  2. She’s the boss because she knows how to set goals and reach them. That’s what she’s looking for from you.
  3. She’s likely to make a decision on this first call. Be fast, decisive, and get to the point. She has no time for small talk.
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The Peacock

Standing businesswomanYou’re the vendor calling on the CEO of a small company.  The reason for the sales call is to let the CEO know that you’re not going to cave on the negotiation point she wants.

As you’re ushered into her office, she’s standing beside her desk with both hands on her hips.

  1. Why is she standing this way?
  2. Is she intimidated, or is she trying to intimidate you?
  3. Will you ever see subordinates stand like this?

Answers

  1. Like a peacock spreading its feathers, she’s trying to appear larger and fend off any attacks.
  2. Could be both. If she feels she’s about to be ripped off, she’s trying to reestablish her dominance. And if she’s in a position of authority, she’ll stand this way to intimidate others.
  3. Rarely will subordinates confront their boss like this, unless they’re suddenly angered or suffer some sort of indignation.

What’s She Thinking?

What's She ThinkingYou’ve completed your presentation before your client’s group and you’re taking questions. You notice the marketing director’s chin rests upon her thumb, her index finger points upwards, and she has a slight smile.

  1. Is she having positive or negative thoughts?
  2. What does her posture say?
  3. What should you do?

Answers

  1. Most people think this is a signal of interest. It’s not. She’s having negative or critical thoughts about you or your presentation. Even though she has a smile, the negative gestures outweigh the positives.
  2. Leaning away from you with her arm in front of her torso completes the cluster of negative signals that should warn you to do something.
  3. Get her involved immediately. Simply stating, “You seem to have some concerns. Would you mind telling me what you think?” will get her to change her body language and attitude.

Do You Feel Lucky? Well…Do You?

Four leaf cloverPsychologist Dr. Richard Wiseman (Quirkology) did some research into luck. He wanted to find out if some people considered themselves lucky, while others considered themselves unlucky. In one experiment he gave volunteers copies of newspapers and asked them to count the number of photographs in them.

What he didn’t tell them is he had a page printed that said “Win £100 by Telling the Experimenter You Have Seen This.” The unlucky people were so focused on counting the pictures they never saw it. The lucky people were more relaxed and spotted the chance to win £100. Wiseman said it was “a simple demonstration of how lucky people can create their good fortune by making the most of an unexpected opportunity.”

The lesson? Set your goals, but keep your eyes open for the unexpected. The unexpected can happen at any time and will often be more rewarding.

Break the Hypnotic Trance

English: two-seam fastball 日本語: ツーシームの握り

Joe Vitale (Buying Trances) says that prospects are often in a trance. “All vendors are the same” is a trance.

Joe said that what the salesperson has to do is move the client from his trance to the salesperson’s trance in three steps.

  1. Identify his trance. (“All vendors are the same.”)
  2. Agree with his beliefs to gain rapport. (“Yes, we do seem to look alike.”)
  3. Lead his belief to your offer. (“But here’s what makes us different.” New trance.)

Practice it with your kids.

“All baseball pitches are the same,” your child says.

“Yes,” you agree, “they certainly all look alike.”

Then show your child the four-seam fastball grip.

“This pitch will appear to rise when it’s not because it’s not dropping as fast as the batter’s brain thinks it should.”

Next, show your two-seam fastball grip.

“What makes this pitch different is it’s slightly slower and causes the baseball to change directions.”

Change people’s trances to change their beliefs.